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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    1,611

    The end of the violent games contorversy???

    I started to post a response to Gollum15's thread in the Half Life 2 forum, about his Mom objecting to blood and gore in games, and something hit me that I'd like the community's opinion on, if I could.

    I would like a "V-Chip" for games.

    For those who don't know what a V-Chip is, it's a small chip required by law to be installed in all new TVs in the US. It takes a look at the rating of the show the TV is tuned to, and if it exceeds the rating the V-Chip is set to, it won't show it. Very simple, very easy.

    When the V-Chip was first announced, I thought it was terrible. After giving it some thought, though, I now think that this is the BEST thing for protecting MY rights as an adult to watch the things I want to, without someone censoring the programming I want access to.

    The V-Chip puts the RESPONSIBILTY into the hands of the VIEWER, and that's what makes it awesome. People can no longer complain about a shows content if the rating is correct. The argument goes from blaming the broadcaster with "How could you show that" to blaming the viewer with "Why did YOU watch it?". With the simple easy V-Chip, people that do want to watch all sorts of programming can, and people who don't are fully empowered to avoid it.

    We need this for games!!!

    Imagine the ratings for games built right into the code, something that Windows can read and take action on. The game has a M rating? If Mommy and Daddy have done the right thing and set Windows not to play M games, or not to play them without a password, then Junior is saved! No more angry letter to their local Congressman about violent video games in the hands of kids! No more upset parents catching their kids playing Grand Theft Auto!

    I KNOW that if people simply READ the ratings on the boxes, they'd be fine, and that if parents paid attention to what their kids are playing they'd be fine. Giving them safeguards like this not only empowers them, though, it also firmly places the responsibility on THEM now, not the government, not the game companies, not Wal-Mart, noone but them, which is right where it should be. There'd be no worming out of it after the Z (for Zebulon, of course ) Chip hit.

    I honestly think this could fix it. I can easily see Bill Gates jumping right on board, too. He's socially responsible, and he's also a gamer at heart, so he'd be killing two brids with one stone. I think this could work.

    What do YOU guys think? Good idea? Bad idea? Holes I haven't thought about? Let me know!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Malaysia
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    2,868
    if they know they RESPONSIBILTY V-Chip will not be needed .but do they? so go fo it

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
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    7,090
    Umm... don't the PS2 and XBox both have parental features on it? If a game is rated above the settings, it requires a password. I'm not 100% certain on that, considering I haven't tried.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
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    I don't like it, but I also know that alot of people feel the need to complain about these things so I think it's a good idea. I forsee 2 issues with this idea though.

    1. The system would have to be implemented by parents, which in many cases don't have the computer savvy that their kids do, shich means that the kids will be able to bypass the system causing even greater outrage from some people.

    2. If the code is embedded in such a fashion that it is easily bypassed, it will be hacked and changed which leads to the same problem as in 1.

    In all I think it's a good idea, but the implementation would be key. You would need to make sure that it doesn't cause more problems than there already are. Since you know that if a parent feels that they are protected (even if they don't do it right) and they find theie kids playing a violent game, it's CLEARLY not the parents fault.
    confused by earlier errors
    bailing out

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Herman Miller Aeron chair
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    14,520
    The responsibility is NOT on the viewer. The responsibility is entrusted to technology and the agencies that decide what ratings the Vchip will use. The Vchip is just another layer of government interference for people to lazy to parent their own children. You don't want Johnny playing GTA? Don't buy it for him. It's the parents' duty to monitor what their kids do/watch/hear not the governments'.
    Paul Holm
    Toronto

    "The potato peelings in the sink, did not turn into vodka as I had hoped." - Mishka Shubaly

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    MD right now - hopefully someday, sunny FL!
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    2,319
    Exactly. Nothing will replace educated parents. Parents that are already too lazy to check on their children are going to rely on technology to further their laziness.
    However, I'm sure there are some folks that could legitimately use the help. If they were to implement something like that, it should be strictly optional.

    EDIT: Also, how long does it take to look at the rating before going to the checkout line at walmart?
    How long does it take to peek into your kid's room every once in a while?
    How long does it take to check their game inventory?
    How difficult is it to know that someone is playing a violent game when you see blood and guts all over the screen?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    2,034
    I dont like it for the same reasons that Vetts posted. It would probably be fairly easy for the kids to bypass it and it would have to be implemented very well to make it so the kids cant bypass it.
    And as the other people are saying, if you dont want your kid playing a game, then dont let them buy it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Calgary, Canada
    Posts
    7,090
    Also, how long does it take to look at the rating before going to the checkout line at walmart?
    In my situation... take movies for example. I could look at the ratings and determine if it is suitable for my child or not. But I want to watch it. So, I buy the movie. Say my child is older and able to load his own DVDs. I have a babysitter and I fail to mention that he shouldn't watch certain movies. He decides to watch one with the excuse that I let him watch it all the time. Without some kind of parental lock, my failure to mention he shouldn't watch those movies becomes a failure without a failsafe. I would rather have the option of parental control available to me as a failsafe than not have any optional control what-so-ever.
    How long does it take to check their game inventory?
    Same situation... what if they found my game inventory while I was away?

    Just because some parents would rely on parental controls doesn't mean others should be denied the option of parental control locks as a failsafe. Once my boy is old enough to start really noticing stuff on the TV screens, the parental locks are going on for my satellite reciever, DVD player and every video game system I have that supports it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,611
    Originally posted by Paul Holm
    The responsibility is NOT on the viewer. The responsibility is entrusted to technology and the agencies that decide what ratings the Vchip will use. The Vchip is just another layer of government interference for people to lazy to parent their own children. You don't want Johnny playing GTA? Don't buy it for him. It's the parents' duty to monitor what their kids do/watch/hear not the governments'.
    That's the point!!! With password control fully in the hands of the consumer, it WOULDN'T be in the hands of the government. How can the V-Chip be government interference? Without someone on the consumer's end to activate it, it doesn't do a thing. It IS up to the parents to take control, but with the V-Chip (and the Z-Chip), it's SO in their control that they can't blame anyone else if their kids end up playing the games they don't want them to.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    1,355
    I agree completely with my fellow Flames fan. Just because a parent wants to use technology to assist them, doesn't make them a bad parent. And I play games (UT2k4) that I might not want an 8 year old playing. Using technology to assist you, does not make you a lazy parent. Sadly there are a lot of bad parents, but there are also a lot of good ones who would use technology like this to assist them. That's what technology is for, to assist, not replace. There are going to be parents that are lazy no matter what... So don't blame that on technology. Blame it on them.
    confused by earlier errors
    bailing out

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