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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,191

    The spy in your computer

    Apparently about 5% of the people who receives those fake emails DRESSED to look like your Bank or Paypal or eBay service do give away their log in info!

    It is not that hard to understand... your bank or paypal support will never ask you for your log in name and password... soif an email does that it is of course a fake.
    Sadly some of this email are also installing spy-software in users PCs. Software that records keystrokes and takes pics of your screen so that the BAD GUYS can get all the info they need about you bank and other financial details

    I hope no one here so far has been victim of this increasingly upsetting way to rob people.

    I have just renewed my Antivirus software, ther is a decent offer from Symantec for a 3Users license.. cheaper then buying 3 separate ones if you have a network at home, like a couple of PCs and a Laptop for example.
    And a good hardware Firewall is a must.

    For example if you are on boradband and simply have a USB bog standard modem... the minimum you need is a softwre firewall, but an hardware one would be better as they are supposed to be much more secure



    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programme...st/4019807.stm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4037975.stm







    Websense's top tips to prevent attacks on your account:


    Never follow a link in an email if you suspect the message might not be genuine. Don't follow links on Instant Messaging services either.
    If you want to find your Online bank, always type its URL into your browser.
    Do not open attachments in emails unless you are absolutely sure you're waiting to receive that particular file.
    Always check suspicious looking emails with the sender. Be very wary of e-mails asking for your personal financial details.
    Keep your PC operating system up to date and update your anti-virus software frequently
    Use a personal firewall.
    You can also get software to detect and remove spyware.
    Do not use the same password for all of your online accounts.
    Do not store online account information and passwords in files held on your computer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    3,821
    agreed. i think the topic of viruses, spyware, etc. should be discussed in details with people who know about them or have been attacked by them. internet security is a high issue, i'm sure, on everyone's mind at some point or another. it is for me and i've been trying to do all i can to deter these events from happening.

    also, perhaps those who know of great links to things like, ad-busters, spy-bot, etc. can link here... here are a few i know of that have been given pretty good reviews (review them yourself! don't take evreyone's word for them... ):

    http://www.adbusters.com - many things
    http://www.noadware.net - SpyBot
    http://www.grisoft.com/ - AVG
    i can't remember a few more but there are many.

    also, things like keeping your updates frequent as was mentioned using things like:

    http://www.symantec.com/downloads/ - security downloads
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/security/default.mspx - maintaining windows security
    http://v5.windowsupdate.microsoft.co....aspx?ln=en-us - windows updates
    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/of...e/default.aspx - microsoft office updates
    http://www.microsoft.com/security/default.mspx - microsoft security home page

    (sorry to mac users, i don't have anything for you that i know of, however, i also know that you are less liable to be effected by viruses and so on. i like macs as well, but can't afford one right now... )

    there are many things you can do. research things and be safe!

    hope any of these links helped atleast one person.
    - Rik

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,153
    the thing that annoys me is the fact that these days you really can't go without a firewall and a virus scanner (and maybe even realtime spyware protection). All of this software just slows down your machine and as for me (I like to play games) it does have an affect on your gaming experience. I guess if you really want to be safe, you have to disconnect your computer from the internet which is almost a sin as it would mean that I could not visit 3DBUzz on a daily basis!!
    A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.
    --Erin Majors

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,191
    yes, they slow things down it is damn true...

    but if you have some sort of troian software or those spyware stuff that gather info and send them out to the info robber they also slow your PC down and use your broadband bandwidth...
    like those stupid apps that look at your browsing habits... feed the info back to their base and then they send ads to you targeted to your habits.

    Some of this stuff you actually agree to for example when install on your PC free video codecs and Peer To peer stuff... damn iT!
    Well sometime you have the option to buy a version without adserve part.

    I often have a look at my Task manager (CTRL ALT DELETE)
    Performance Tab and especially the Processes Tab that lists all the apps running on your PC. From there you can see if you have some sasser virus, or stuff like Gator adserv running etc...
    Do a research for each of the apps running under your Processes list and make sure they all need to be there...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    3,821
    Gator is one that bothers me quite a bit...
    - Rik

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,191
    the only adserver type of trade off I can accept is the one with the free version of Eudora....fair enough

    I made a choice to never install anything anymore that is ad supported (if I can avoid it).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Northwest USA
    Posts
    291
    My favorites are the e-mails from banks I don't have accounts with asking for my SS# and stuff. Not that I'd send that info to my bank either, but these are so pathetic it's laughable.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,191
    yes.. so pathetic that 5% of people getting those emails are actually clicking on the link and geving away their info!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    doh!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,153
    yep that is the strenght of such ads....there are millions of people who don't really know what they are doing behind a computer and fall for these kinds of traps.

    I actually got a great piece of "normal" mail at home a couple of weeks ago. It was a letter telling me that I had won 40.000 euros !!! It said I hadn't received it yet because they tried to contact me by mail and couldn't. All I had to do was fill in a form and I would get the cash. Closer inspection revealed that the form I had to fill in was an agreement to have have 40 euros a month written of my account!!! I can't imaging anyone falling for that but talk about flase advertisement. I think if something like that happened in America, the sender would be sued to pieces. Maybe I should see if there is legal action that can be taken. I don't think that kind of false advertisment should be allowed!
    A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle.
    --Erin Majors

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    118
    In terms of a virus checker, I would definitely recommend Nod32 (UK). It's updated extremely often and almost always before knowledge of the virus goes public, the heuristics are excellent and most of all it's got a really low footprint/overhead (which was a primary concern for me).

    In terms of a firewall, I'm sitting behind an IPTables setup which is pretty locked down so I don't have one locally installed, especially as last time I had one it screwed up my network stack something rotton and I had to do a manual winsock fix to get it working again. But the thing is of course, that if you're using a direct connection a firewall is no longer optional - you use one or you WILL pay.

    The scam emails themselves are gearing more towards social engineering/phishing aspects nowadays, but at least the older style ones will have a much harder time getting in with decent protection. The rest (unfortunately) has to be down to common sense, which is often not kept up to date by users and there's no auto-update for that particular feature...

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