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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    coquitlam, bc, canada
    Posts
    1,442
    Are there limits to how many Static Meshes, Textures, or Other things that can be Imported into MyLevel?

    The reason I ask is that suddenly the mylevel in a Map I'm working on won't Import a Static Mesh I created in Maya. I haven't counted how many StaticMeshes I have Imported so far, but it's probably 50+.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    741
    It shouldn't be a problem, maybe extreme mesh usage on the level, but not in the myLevel package, maybe retry?


  3. #83
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    coquitlam, bc, canada
    Posts
    1,442
    Originally posted by Dynamit
    It shouldn't be a problem, maybe extreme mesh usage on the level, but not in the myLevel package, maybe retry?
    Upon further thought(and trying to Import the Mesh into a different Package), I think I just funked up the Mesh with too liberal an application of Bevel.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    741
    so, it works now? weeeeeeeeee


  5. #85
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    10

    Newbie thoughts...

    I've just started mapping in UnrealED and just from my perspective I think what has helped me the most is the VTM's. I think I learned more in two hours of watching the VTM's than I did in reading various tutorial for weeks. I think the BUZZ VTM's are great because they are not perfect and a lot of problems like grid snapping, alignment issues, duplicating problems are encountered and they show you how to address these issues on the fly. I think that is a most valuable lesson. Also, I agree with the thought that playablitiy is most important. I think it's wise to design a level bare bones with no static meshes first and actually test play the level with only rooms and movers to see how fun it is first before adding static meshes. Most static meshes are just decoration anyway and you can only be impressed with eyecandy for so long. Espesically when the level it boring as hell. I guess the best way to learn anything though is practice, practice, practice. I like one of the suggestions someone posted on this thread and that was to spend a week on individual aspects of the level design software. Spend a week on adding and subtracting brushes, a week on lighting, a week on meshes and movers. I think that focusing on certain aspects of each part is a great way to learn!.......VTM's rock though......I say go though the VTM's to get a good overall view of things then play with each part of the program.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    741
    Quote Originally Posted by PappaSmurf
    I think it's wise to design a level bare bones with no static meshes first and actually test play the level with only rooms and movers to see how fun it is first before adding static meshes.
    This is what they're doing for the UT2007, so they can make changes as long as it isn't expensive, then the map is going to get passed on to the art guys.
    If you translate expensive to demand of time, you don't want to be spending days and days and days on something that in the end will suck. This is a good idea indeed.


  7. #87
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Suffolk England
    Posts
    75
    Things to avoid if your just starting out and want to make a good map making a plan on paper is a good idea but I never do it as I like to work as I go along.

    First I start buy using the basic shapes cubes and tubes and use the vertex editing tool to build my ramps and slopes I also use the 3d shape editor to get more awkward shapes.I first build my basic lay out until I am happy with it dont add any thing yet just get the basic structure first.Add lights to see what your doing in there of course but reduce there raduis to about 32.When your happy with your lay out run around in it to see how it feels and use height and depth to give a larger then life feel to your maps.

    Go take a look at DM-Grendalkeep its a great map study it and see how the use of depth and static meshes make it feel real.Wack the w key and turn off the static meshes then you can study the raw lay out.

    Next I start selecting a set of textures to work with and keep a note book handy so I dont forget what I am using.Start adding your textures slowly work on one area only and find the right type of textures for it.Use a set of textures and try to have theme to give your map an overall togetherness.

    Now start selecting some static meshes again try to stick to a theme and use the group browser tool for your items so you can find them and select them easily.The idea here is to work on one bit at a time structure texture lighting pathing for your bots and zoning.When I first started mapping I tryed to do it all at once you soon learn that it just give you a crap map in the end.

    When I have completed the structure the textures and static mesh themes and lighting I usually work with movers and triggers and karma actors see the buzz tutorials for them great content.I leave bot pathing and zoning till last.

    Of all the things I find the most difficult the one you will come unstuck on is getting the structure right.Most beginners maps suffer from this,you make a room you add a hall way you connect to another room you slap in a few static meshes to make it look better but its boring.
    To break this pattern use the vertex editing tool on your brushes and use the 2d shape editor tool more try to think of your map as a hollywood film set theres nothing behind that tall tower but it looks great and that false wall adds depth.Try making a map using nothing but 256x256 cubes and shape them up with the vertex editor and then use only the 2d shape editor for connecting halls and rooms that should force you to stop making cubes and halls maps.
    Last of all use sound and light carefully they both can make or break your maps.And stay fresh take a break from your map for a day or two them come back to it.I worked on a map for so long once I started to have dreams about it like I was living in it freaky!
    Hope that helps you out a bit if your just starting.Stay cool...

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Frisco, TX
    Posts
    18

    Talking I so needed this

    It was great to see a thread from another newbie asking for cool tips. This way we don't have to bug people. Joy! Mr. Slackpants rocks.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,720

    Thumbs up Actor Properties window disapeared

    Here is how you can get back the Actor Properties Window once it has disapeared. If your editor is open then save your level and close it. Then go to your ut2004\system directory and edit your user.ini file in notepad. Search the file for the line starting with this:-

    ActorProperties=

    Delete that line and save you user.ini then close notepad. Now boot up your Ued and if you now open the Actor Properties window you will see it in its default position.

    Fixed !
    WindyBut
    Last edited by WindyBut_UK; 05-01-2006 at 12:20 AM.
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  10. #90
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    24
    sry, if I will repeat someones` else post (I didn`t read carefully ALL the pages, but recently I discowered that sometimes it is a real dillema to decide where to choose between static meshes and BSP.

    I mean for big pieces, like a building, staircases or a galleries. I am used to work in 3dsmax and started learning to UnrealEd just recently. So, evidently, for me it is much faster to do maximum of stuff in max and then just import to unrealed. But lightning appeared to be the most important obstacle. Because SM do NOT receive nice shadowmaps as BSPs, and instead they use per-vertex lightning which is far from being correct and nice

    This means that if I want to make a sunset, for instance, and want to have nice long shadows casted on my (complex) architectture I would get a mix of shadowmaps and triangular-looking shading (since a "complex" for me means combination of bsp and sm). Projectrors won`t always help in case of multiple objects one behind another.
    So BSPs r sometimes useful even for smaller architectural parts.
    But hopefully unrealed imports meshes as brushes as well

    For now, i see a solution in studiying carefully where light will get, how intence, where shadows will play important part in design and where thast "mix", which I mentioned above, won`t be too evident. I also suggest to increase resolution of those SM, which will appear to be in a "lightning-complex" situation or in a shadowmap-light place.

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