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  1. #1
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    Something I've always wondered about drawing / 2D design

    Is it something you can learn through a lot of practice or is it something that you almost need to be naturally good at? On and off I've spent many years trying to get better. Unfortunately due to having epilepsy my hands shake just a little, so I've got to grip the pencil really hard in order to compensate for this, which I've found that makes it harder to erase the mistakes. I'm also left handed which means that I typically smudge my drawing as I go a long as I hold the pencil in 'the hook' grip, I've tried to hold it differently but my lines tend to be terrible because of the tremors.

    I have certainly improved with my drawing, just not really a great deal over the last 10 years, this has made it difficult to stay motivated. I would love to get to the level where I can draw my own image planes, but I'll be lucky to make concept art, let alone something that lines up on various orthographic views.
    - Knotty Boy


  2. #2
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    Jul 2010
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    I firmly believe anyone can learn. Natural talent can make it easier. It can also make for laziness. But anyone can learn, it just takes a ton of repetition.

  3. #3
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    Absolutely anyone can draw. My main takeaway from Life Drawing back in college is learning to draw what you see before drawing what you think you see/know. We have a tendency to look at a subject and think "Ahh, an arm, I know what an arm looks like." and then draw it from memory. The subject can be right there in front of you, but I promise you will try to draw from memory without truly looking at the subject, the proportions and how the parts all line up. "Gifted" people have only one thing truly going for them; They have a strong ability to visually retain and recall a subject. They will also try to draw from what they think they know, even if the subject is right in front of them, but their ability to retain what they think they know is good. That's really all it is.

    The good news is that you can train and strengthen your brain's ability to visually retain things gaining an understanding of the fundamentals. You need to practice rendering (Drawing a subject that you are looking at), before drawing original works from your mind. This will teach you things like composition, foreshortening, how light interacts, and a bunch of other things we take for granted.



    I'm so mad that I can't find this TED Talk I recently watched, but I'll keep looking. This gentleman talks about how he teaches people rehabilitating from a stroke to draw with their off hand. These are older men and women that have lost their ability to talk and write, yet he has them all drawing simple cartoon characters. It doesn't directly relate to your question, but if you connect the dots, there is inspiration there.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgCody View Post
    I'm so mad that I can't find this TED Talk I recently watched, but I'll keep looking. This gentleman talks about how he teaches people rehabilitating from a stroke to draw with their off hand. These are older men and women that have lost their ability to talk and write, yet he has them all drawing simple cartoon characters. It doesn't directly relate to your question, but if you connect the dots, there is inspiration there.
    I watched a few of the ted videos lately, enjoyed the one about tamil children in india learning to use the internet, the gentleman doing the talk did the project in conjunction with the university I went to, in fact it was the same department.
    - Knotty Boy


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cgCody View Post
    I'm so mad that I can't find this TED Talk I recently watched, but I'll keep looking. This gentleman talks about how he teaches people rehabilitating from a stroke to draw with their off hand. These are older men and women that have lost their ability to talk and write, yet he has them all drawing simple cartoon characters. It doesn't directly relate to your question, but if you connect the dots, there is inspiration there.
    Is it this one?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7TXEZ4tP06c (Why people believe they can’t draw - and how to prove they can | Graham Shaw | TEDxHull)
    I thought this was very interesting to watch.

  6. #6
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    Zally, that's the one! Thanks!

  7. #7
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    Oct 2015
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    Practice has always been essential to our success. I've failed many times, but now I have learned many things after the failure

  8. #8
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    Aug 2010
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    Hey @Knotty boy .

    I would say that you can compensate in any way you want that gets you the result you are after. Most artists cannot draw a straight line and that's absolutely fine, because the important thing an artist does is decide what to draw, not how to draw it.

    Use a ruler for drawing lines, smudge it all up with a cloth or paper to get it smooth, use vector graphics programs if you don't want to deal with individual pixels or use collage if you're more interested in creating mood over generating completely original shapes.

    The rules of art are there to help us, but if they aren't helping, then throw them out.

    I'm not super big on art but I work at it every week and I am getting better. I think it's an important skill to have, just as reading or cooking is.

    Oh and, before I forget, create what interests YOU, otherwise you'll be bored and people viewing your work will be too.
    I'm so negative, like an electron.

  9. #9
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    Jun 2008
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    @Knotty boy, here is a suggestion, get a pressure digital pen, and take a look at lazy nazumy application, the concept behind lazy nazumy is that no sane human can draw straight line using mouse on computer, so the program puts sort of smoothing and lagging in drawing the line, that should easily fix your tremor problem, the only thing remaining, is to get used to use the pressure digital pen and something like gimp instead of pencil and paper, but that doesn't really matter, these days many great artists are moving toward digital painting. I hope that small application combined with digital pen would fix the problems that epilepsy gives you, the rest, well, when you see progress you would have all the motivation you need

    ps. also you may want to consult your doctor for implication of something like propranolol or another anti tremor application, that may help too, but having epilepsy, makes it difficult for general practitioners to implement the drug, it should be a neural specialist, I hope that would also help.
    If you want to learn something, start teaching about it to others, nothing will help you more than that !

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