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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    100

    I bought the C# 101 - Spring 2012

    I respect everyone that went into making these tutorials. I am grateful for 3DBuzz that made these videos for people(artists) like me to learn, C#. But, I'm finding the tutorials really hard to follow. There is so much segway. It seems like these videos were made for people that already know how to code. These videos don't seem like they were meant for beginners.

    Am I wrong, does anyone have a way to approach these tutorials so an artist can learn C#?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Dickson, TN
    Posts
    564
    Hi Sean,

    I've been learning C# as well. (when time allows). These sessions were originally a live class and you have to bear that in mind when you go through them. When they segway to a student reference, just ignore that and continue to watch. I recommend no more than an hour of class time a day, just to let the concepts brew over night. Less if it's not coming as fast as you'd like. In this case slow and steady wins the race.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    100
    Will do. Thank you, SJC2112.

    Sean

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    100
    These videos are so hard to get through. I'm trying to take it a little bit at a time, but there is so much segway. I'm constantly asking myself,"where are these lessons heading to?" Or, "how do all these seemingly random variations of how to write one line of code, help me?" It would be great if there was a project in mind and the instructor helped break down what questions need to be asked in order to solve the problem, then the instructor teach the C# tools that are used to solve the problem.

    I really appreciate the intent to teach that the 3DBuzz team has.

    It would be great if the lessons were set up like a math class. First you learn one thing, then you use that lesson as a platform to learn the next lesson; always moving forward based on what you learn in the prior lesson.

    Is there anyone at 3DBuzz that can take the time to redo these lessons with a project in mind? The project can be the theme of the lesson and help keep the lessons on course; moving forward and no segwaying. I'm sure there are many ways to code, but can't these beginner lessons stick to one way to write the code so the student can get something under his belt before learning other ways to write the same line of code? The beginner does not need to learn 3 ways to write the code right away. If the project can be taught with one mind set, then complete the project. After the project is completed and digested, there could be another lesson on how to optimize the code. Finally, give the student a similar problem to the first example and see if the student can write the code based on what he/she has just learned.

    The following lesson can incorporate the previous lesson and be a base for the next lesson.

    There seem to be too many people teaching the class. Can one person handle the questions that don't pertain to a beginning class off video? Can the second instructor, type the answer to the question that does not pertain to a beginning in a chat window? These advanced questions just throw the beginner off, and it takes a lot of mental fortitude to get back into the lesson.

    Agian, I have a lot of respect for the 3DBuzz team. I really want to learn how to program in C# so I can do more in Unity.
    Last edited by hotsauce; 11-25-2014 at 05:47 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    547
    @hotsauce
    First of all, where are you stuck at? Is there a particular wall that you find yourself stuck at?

    Also there is another C# 101 session (see c# 101 2013) that streamlines the experience a bit by removing parentheses from the main point. The series is free to stream and to download (not sure about the download part but streaming is free).

    Another approach to teaching C# is by looking at the XNA volumes series. There are pros and contras regarding this series. The main pro is that, from what some member say, it is a good starting point to learn about the subject. The contra is that since the XNA has been discontinued / not supported anymore by Microsoft you will have to do a bit of extra work to be able to follow along with the series. The first part is free to stream and, thus, you can form an opinion if this is something of interest to you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    100
    Thank you for the reply. I can't seem to follow the lessons, there is nothing there to let me know how to apply these lessons to programming a project. I say this with much respect and only love for the 3DBuzz crew. I can't even describe what it is like, sorry. The free flowing style of instruction and segway questions that make the beginner ask," why is he asking this question" make it very hard to keep up with the lessons. I'll try the c# 101 2013. Thank you for suggesting it.

    It would be great if there were something that pertained directly to Unity, C# and making simple games for the beginner that does not know about programming.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1
    If you have never programmed before, you'll be lost in c# 101(2012/2013) classes or even XNA101. I think one has to have at least some knowledge in other programming languages to get started with the classes offered at 3DBuzz. If you are an artist you need some kind of supplementary material and the best one is a book IMHO(not another video course). There are some choices around, the book that helped me tremendously is "Learning C# Programming with Unity 3D" by Alex Okita. Its a long read but it assumes no working knowledge of C# or Unity and takes you from absolute beginner to a good foundation. Every concept in c# language is immediately applied to Unity enviroment and in the end you get solid knowledge in both.
    I'm not affiliated with the author in any way, bought Kindle edition at Amazon (some online reading resources are available too) and this book got me started. After reading it, I returned to Unity 101 class, c# 101, 102, 103 here at 3DBuzz and was able to follow those.

    Hope this helps in some way.

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