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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    13

    How much to charge?

    Hi I'm doing a 5 minutes animated music video. Its basically this two guys encounter in NYC and start fighting then they transforms like power rangers and more fight, then they call this huge robots (megazords) and keep fighting until a bigger alien robot appears and the two of the them merge into one bigger robot to fight this enemy.

    The work that i'm doing includes:
    concept art
    storyboards & animatics
    previsualization
    modeling
    rigging
    texturing
    animating
    rendering
    compositing
    and video editing.

    how much is right to charge? I'm a one man shop. I'm doing everything myself.
    here is the link to two teasers i created for the video.

    part1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9RY_Cfcsb0

    part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T42Kc...endscreen&NR=1

    I appreciate your help.
    thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    501
    This is about two years old but these are some numbers I go by.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I can't remember the article that I got this from, maybe its somewhere on my favs. I saved this cause I thought it was a good reference.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.

    Follow me on Twitter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    California, Utah, and Washington
    Posts
    3,070
    Quote Originally Posted by VeraFX81 View Post
    This is about two years old but these are some numbers I go by.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Man. If I was even halfway decent at rigging and modeling I would look for a few piece jobs like that, and I'd have my car fixed in no time.
    F***, a medium poly character, rigged? Two of those and I can buy a new engine. Or spend a month making a nice level and I'd have wheels again.
    But dang it, I'm not skilled enough to charge prices like that.
    Read my Webcomic:
    maytiacomic.com
    Check up on my progress at:
    marscaleb.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    112
    Sometimes I forget just how much our knowledge is worth. I get requests all the time from people who would like art done for them, but if they have to pay more then a few dollars they suddenly lose interest.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    coventry, england
    Posts
    1,173
    A good tip would be to mentally work out how long this is going to take, you've done a test animation so you should have a rough idea. then you need to work out how much your time is worth, an hourly rate. with a bit of maths you should have a good number.

    also don't forget to add one or two extra days just encase something goes tits up.

    my personal website showing the best of my work
    click me to go to my website

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    501
    Quote Originally Posted by tadpole3159 View Post
    A good tip would be to mentally work out how long this is going to take, you've done a test animation so you should have a rough idea. then you need to work out how much your time is worth, an hourly rate. with a bit of maths you should have a good number.

    also don't forget to add one or two extra days just encase something goes tits up.
    I second tadpole's reply. But if I may add, I don't do an hourly rate cause I have a day job but you can use the same strategy in guessing how long it will take to complete. And always give a price thats worth your time. If anything over a few bucks scares people away then thats good because those people are the type that would never complete their side of the contract.
    I worked on tons of projects over the years that I would charge next to nothing only to have the person or company back out or lose focus. Remember everyone out there with a brain has a cool Idea for a video game, movie, animation etc.

    Also make your portfolio speak for yourself. If people are saying "wow" to your reel or portfolio then don't be afraid to talk about money. I certainly don't think most people are going to find someone that studied as long as we, to work on a long project with their stomach growling. Furthermore most people have no Idea what goes into animation or creating in 3d or 2d. Its insane how simple they think it is, you should take the time and explain what it consist of so they can have a change at understanding your price. Seriously people think creating something like the avengers was made by a small team with a couple of clicks of a mouse and photoshop lol!

    Sorry about the organization of all this, I've been through a lot of dead end projects and passionate when I'm sharing about it. Right now I'm doing a project for free, there is a payoff of a legitimate film in my resume and portfolio.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.

    Follow me on Twitter

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    coventry, england
    Posts
    1,173
    I recommend downloading this free 3d art book. it was put together by some chaps over on polycount.com in their spare time and released for free, really awesome stuff, and it has a section on freelancing too.

    I think i'll make a thread just so everyone knows

    http://www.artbypapercut.com/

    my personal website showing the best of my work
    click me to go to my website

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Behind you
    Posts
    796
    One good thing is to have several price options. Hourly, weekly and monthly. There also is the "per project" basis which smaller clients (inexperienced clients with 3D/2D work) in their mind probably assume the most. Be sure to calculate them well before jumping into random numbers. Take into account such as rent, food, travel (if that's the case), etc.

    Also have different price ranges for them. One bare minimum, if it goes below that then you should not work for them, an "average" which you can live on and of course it can go up from there.
    However, here's a post that explains this more in-depth.

    http://forums.cgsociety.org/showpost...28&postcount=7

    From the thread: http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthre...?f=2&t=1034532
    Portfolio

    * Dave has kicked Dobe from #3dbuzz (Dave)
    * Dobe (Dobe@A8F9D847.174C8020.329AD7F2.IP) has joined #3dbuzz
    <Dobe> Hi Dave
    <Dave> Hi
    <Dave> hows it going?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,166
    I have to agree with Vera that charging an hourly rate is the wrong way to go, especially if you plan on doing freelance fairly regularly. By doing it this way, you are over charging the client if you are inexperienced because you're slow, and you are undercharging and losing money as you get better. You literally take a pay cut because you're more skilled than you used to be. It's completely backwards!

    The best way to do it is to decide on a specific set of quantifiable measurements and use those for the basis of your costs. For example, you can charge based on poly count for models, number of frames for rendering, or any number of quantities such as lighting elements, textures, characters, whatever. This way once you have a set price, you will actually benefit from becoming more proficient in your craft! If you do a job today for $5000 and it takes you six weeks at 40 hours a week, and you do that same job three years from now, it may only take you two. That's a pay raise! The first time around you were making $20.83 an hour...the second time you were making $62.50!

    One other thing...and this is a bit off topic, but it sounds like a pretty big job, so make absolutely sure you have a contract written up and signed before you begin work. Doing freelance, especially larger projects, outside of a contractual agreement can very easily end in disaster and a lot of wasted time for one or both of you.
    -Mr. 3d


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Eastern Europe
    Posts
    391
    Quote Originally Posted by VeraFX81 View Post
    This is about two years old but these are some numbers I go by.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_9509.png 
Views:	380 
Size:	234.4 KB 
ID:	73148

    I can't remember the article that I got this from, maybe its somewhere on my favs. I saved this cause I thought it was a good reference.
    Wow I would kill for a CGI job that gives me 1000 € per month. I'm an advanced beginner in the world of CGI so I don't know what's the price range for the CGI services. I live in Serbia (Ex-Yugoslavia) so 1000 € per month salary is pretty fantastic in comparison with the other salaries in my country.

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