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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    London
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    8

    Game set design and environment design

    Hi I am a 3D animation student and was wondering what is important when it comes to modelling 3D environments for games. I know low poly modelling is very important, is there work for me out there solely as a modeller if my texturing skills aren't very good?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Behind you
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    I'm not one who holds all the information but I've come to realize that if you want to be an environment artist/modeler then you'd would want to have some texturing skills. Getting a job solely modeling the environment, as it may exist, it's pretty hard. Honestly, there are tons and tons of modelers out there which makes the competition so much harder.
    I'd highly recommend studying texturing (and even lighting although that might be "the cherry on top" and not really necessary).

    What I would recommend if your texturing skills aren't up to par is to seek out some mod groups or even indie companies/indie groups (good website to check out is Game Artist). They tend not to have as high standards with their recruits.
    But yeah, I'm not an expert just telling you what has been told to me.
    Good luck!
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2
    Hi,
    I am also a environmental artist.i am in the mid of creation of a game scene.If you know something about advanced texturing.Please share with me some links and what do you think is currently in the game scene.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    112
    I was told something similar, that everyone in the industry knows how to model, and that you need to know at least one other thing besides that if you want to stand out. I was advised that rigging is one of the best things to know, animating being the best. Especially with those high-end film models, where there can be thousands of rig bones in the face alone.

    I see how a skilled texture artist can also eliminate the need for certain geometry in the model with their superior textures. It is really astounding, things such as folds in clothing, details on a weapon, even body features like veins and scars, all this can be done with just a texture and still look amazing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Behind you
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    796
    I actually want to learn more advanced texturing myself so I don't know too much, however you may want to check this out. It's a very nice and powerful way to work. http://quixel.se/ddo/

    Be sure to check out the videos they have on that site.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    501
    If you really want to get into texturing I recommend Mudbox, its very powerful and I see a lot of professionals use it for texturing.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.

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