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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    157
    One assumes there is some kind of character progression through experience gain or something like that.

    If I as a consumer "choose" a limited time character my progression could be increased - ie. every task that I do receives X amount more experience etc.

    This would result in a system where I would not feel like I had to grind day in and out to progress as fast as everyone else therefore lessening the need to constantly play (eg. reduce the addictive nature of the MMO).

    This is a slightly different mechanic to WOW (at least when I played early on) where you get bonus experience for a period of time (which builds up when you are logged off) - but it still lets you play in an open ended fashion when the bonus xp runs out.

    I like it. In my life I don't have dozens of hours to play the game in a week - so I would choose a limited time character which would allow me to progress at an accelerated rate.

    Ultimately, you could choose to convert your character to a normal time account (with an approprate cooldown of course).

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    near Orlando, Fl
    Posts
    5,302
    Quote Originally Posted by pashapook View Post
    If it is the gamer's responsibility solely.. Then is it ok for companies to intentionally up the addictive nature of their game, not for the sake of fun but to keep you hooked? It's good business that's for sure..but if that is a necessary evil of running a successful MMO why not explore options that allow for a more casual gamer to feel like they can remain competitive on a server they choose.
    My "idea", which is by no means a great one, was not intended to treat anyone like a child, I offered it more as an option, not an end all implementation.

    Don't get me wrong, I am not condemning the industry, I love MMOs. I just wanted to explore some of the ethical implications that come with making one. Another interesting topic would be.. How do you keep addiction high?

    Forgive spelling and grammar .. Trying to post on my iPhone
    Well, ok, yes the game maker has some responsibility and that's why providing a clock in the game or some type of parental controls so that you can monitor or dole out time to your kids is a good idea. As an adult though, I don't want them dictating anything to me as far as how often I can play. I remember even the weekly maintenance down time used to annoy the hell out of me since it was on my day off, meaning half my day off I could not play.
    The odds of hitting your target increase significantly when you aim at it.
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    214
    Quote Originally Posted by mccuskerkevin View Post
    Thinking back on all the MMOs I've played, here are a few items that kept me coming back:

    • Easy to play, difficult to master
    • Variety
    • Fresh content
    • Dynamic world/in game events
    • FUN
    • Excellent story/lore
    • Rewarding crafting system
    I'd like to add to this list:
    PVP!!!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by mccuskerkevin View Post
    Thinking back on all the MMOs I've played, here are a few items that kept me coming back:

    • Easy to play, difficult to master
    • Variety
    • Fresh content
    • Dynamic world/in game events
    • FUN
    • Excellent story/lore
    • Rewarding crafting system
    All the topics listed are the most important aspects of MMO's! definitly

    but I meant things like..

    * using tried and true slot machine algorithm to help dictate your drop rates
    * skinner box methodologies
    * etc

    The "Evil Side"


    Once again I am not condemning these methods, as a matter of fact, If I ran an MMO I would put a lot of resources into leveraging them. I am more interested in the conversation and ideas.
    .

    I completely agree, you do not want to make it feel as though you are forcing restrictions on people, but I think it may be possible to actually expand your market by offering different types of servers geared to a more casual gamer. The idea I put forward has many flaws and was only meant as a conversation stater
    Last edited by pashapook; 02-08-2011 at 08:09 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Lerich View Post
    I'd like to add to this list:
    PVP!!!
    I agree 110% :-)

    edit: 200%
    Last edited by pashapook; 02-08-2011 at 08:14 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Upstate, NY
    Posts
    504
    Quote Originally Posted by pashapook View Post
    why not explore options that allow for a more casual gamer to feel like they can remain competitive on a server they choose.
    There are definitely ways to accomplish this. Off the top of my head EVE, PlanetSide, and even WoW all have at least some aspect that helps level the playing field between low and high hour/week players. In WoW, there's the sleep bonus you get while logged off in a city or inn. EVE pilot's skills continue to train whether or not they're online. And when you level up in PlanetSide, the cert points don't necessarily give you better equipment than lower level players, they just let you utilize more types of equipment without 're-certing'.
    The spice must flow.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    123
    Perhaps a slightly hybrid version of EVE's skill system might work? A regular MMO skill and level progression through gaining XP with quests, combat etc., but with a small increase in a nominated skill over time. That way someone who plays intensively could catch up with a much longer established but inactive character, which is currently not possible in EVE.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Upstate, NY
    Posts
    504
    Oh it's entirely possible, common even. Unless you want to max every skill in the game. Which is completely unnecessary, and nobody has done it. Depending on what you want to do, you could have every relevant skill max'ed out in anywhere from few months to over a year.

    On the topic of our MMOs, I want to come up with some really fun gameplay, that by it's very nature (rather than artificially), makes grinding either pointless or nonsensical.
    Last edited by Wren Akula; 02-09-2011 at 08:24 PM.
    The spice must flow.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,088
    I have seen this done in several web games and usually there is a lot of problems involved with it. Players who are hard core will have other account to slow others down by grieving them. Now you are limited on your time and your whole day has been wasted cause of one a** who doesn't want you out leveling him or is just being hateful. I think that an individual should be responsible for their actions and not the game. If you want to live on it until you die, then so be it. Apparently that individual had some personal issues he/she would rather escape from and regardless of the product they would have found something to "consume" their lives in.

    -Dane
    You know you want to!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    91
    One thing I don't like about a lot of MMOs is the 'grind'. It takes an extreme amount of time to skill up in something, doing mindless activities. I like the free for all PVP type of MMO, but at the same time, you skill up in specific aspects. Your attributes can become master in 20-40 hours of game play, but only in a small set of all the available skills. So you can be a master in fighting with a sword & shield, but have ZERO knowledge of crafting and magic. You can become the best weapons smith in the game where everyone needs to come to you to get the best weapons, but refining and gathering the materials to make those weapons are unknown to you, so you must barter with those sort of tradesmen. That type of build encourages, almost forces you to work with others to keep the economy going. Between that, and have a robust guild/clan system (that includes declaring war, etc) that groups people together has always been fun for me. But the games I have play always excel at one, but lack heavily in another.

    I hope to be able to accomplish a small demo of that from this class. If you take away the grind, but still keep the RPG feel to it by allowing for specialists of all kinds of variations, it allows for casual play, but between larger groups, it comes down to strategy & politics. Wicked fun.
    Last edited by nbyloff; 02-10-2011 at 12:16 PM.

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