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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15

    About the Software

    Hi Zak, about the software you mention, i suggest for all programming files and assets to use a source control like SubVersion ( TortoiseSVN as a GUI) in order to avoid conflicts as we move forward.

    As i understand the code will be created dynamic and a lot of changes will take place. For long projects, it is a good practice to versioning them, otherwise it will be a big mess.

    You have already released videos for member sponsors in the past.
    For anyone interesting here is the link: SVN Videos

    Thanks and Regards,
    Nikos

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    In space
    Posts
    5,428
    Nelson, Jason, and I have already been working with TortoiseHg, with which I've been most impressed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    91
    I use git at work, and have had some exposure to mecurial. But SVN should be the last option.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    3,251
    I too like Git, but TortoiseHg on Windows is much easier to use and offers essentially the same type of source control goodness.

    "Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning." ~Rich Cook

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Bellevue, WA
    Posts
    803
    I've actually used TortoiseHG and TortoiseSVN, but the best software for version control I have used is AlienBrain, I've recently finished using it for a game I finished back in November. AlienBrain works well for both artist asset management and source control. It's worth a look even if you don't use it for MMO.
    http://www.nxn-software.com/

    Also on the topic of software, I didn't see anything mentioned about QA software. On the same project that I used AlienBrain I also used a piece of software called Test Track Pro which is great for keeping track of bugs, crashes, glitches etc... It's actually used by a few companies in the industry including Epic. (You can also mark and make priority list ect...)
    http://www.seapine.com/ttpro.html
    " Imagination is the preview of life's coming attractions " - Albert Einstein
    " If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." - Albert Einstein

    My Website: http://www.gamedevlounge.com/

    If any post is informative please provide positive feedback by clicking the star below.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15
    After a search i found a great solid article about the benefits of HG over SubVersion.
    Take a look, it is a six-part tutorial. HG Init: A Mercurial Tutorial

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    263
    I've only used tortoiseSVN and it works well for me but might have a look into some of the ones mentioned here
    A wise man once said to me, "life is hard, but it's harder if you're stupid" - Duthos

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    170
    I mentioned this in another post but SVN and GIT have been horrible for us when it comes to large 1mb+ art assets. For this reason our art department uses perforce. It's much better at handling large binary files than other version control systems. The Halo Wars code base was about 12 terrabytes in size, there's no way Git or SVN could handle that. I'm sure the MMO project won't be that big but I could see it pushing 25 gigabytes maybe? It really depends but even at that size SVN and Git are probably going to have issues. The only down side to perforce is that it's expensive, however, you can use it for free but you are limited to 2 connections. Anyway, just a suggestion if you're planning on working with many large binary files.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Blackpool, UK
    Posts
    853
    I've only really used SVN, so I'll be looking into into some of the suggestions here (already started looking at git).

    Since version control is an officially supported feature of Unity Pro, does anyone know what the issues would be with Unity Standard (i.e. just adding the the project folder to a version controlled repository)?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    170
    Quote Originally Posted by darkmobius View Post
    I've only really used SVN, so I'll be looking into into some of the suggestions here (already started looking at git).

    Since version control is an officially supported feature of Unity Pro, does anyone know what the issues would be with Unity Standard (i.e. just adding the the project folder to a version controlled repository)?
    When you decide to use unity with version control, you need to go into settings and turn version control on. This will create a metadata file for each asset in your project. You just need to make sure that all these metadata files are versioned with each asset. Also, don't version control the library folder. I think all you need to version control is the assets folder for the most part, unless you have custom source assets somewhere else that you want to version control. You may also want to version control the visual studio project and solution if you're using visual studio.

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