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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    4,521
    Have a read of this: The Photographer's Right. It talks about the law in the US, so you may need to adapt depending on where you live. Basically, if you are in a public place, people are allowed to take your photo, with or without permission.

    If I was taking photos of people, I think it would be polite to ask them if it is ok. Most people don't seem to have a problem with this.

    But as for car number plates, can anyone think of any reason why taking a photo of a car that is otherwise unidentifiable would cause a problem for anybody at all? I see hundreds of number plates every day.

    Edit. Here's a description of the laws in Australia:
    http://www.artslaw.com.au/legalinfor...hersRights.asp

    There is a section talking about number plates:

    Photographing number plates

    A number of photographers have asked Arts Law whether it is illegal to photograph car number plates on the street. While State and Commonwealth legislation permits police and roads authorities to use various Automatic Number Plate Recognition systems (like Safe-T-Cam) to monitor criminal activity such as speeding, the law does not prevent photography of car number plates.
    Last edited by mr_charisma; 08-10-2010 at 10:04 PM.

  2. #12
    Marscaleb Guest
    Guh. I just spent three hours taking pictures downtown and going through them. EVERYTHING I took with the camera I was using came out like utter crap. What a worthless digital camera! It can't NOT take a blurry photo because you have to press the tiny button in like an inch, so you can't not jiggle your image.
    I took pictures on my cell phone and they came out better.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    4,521
    What kind of camera do you have?

    Also, isn't it night time wherever you are? Unfortunately cameras, nomatter how expensive have to obey the laws of physics. That is, the shutter needs to be open longer if there is less light around.

    There are a few things you can do to help. Does your camera have a night mode that will bump up the sensitivity? You'll get more noise, but the images won't be blurry. Also, try resting the camera on a rail or something. Use the self timer so your finger pressing the shutter button doesn't bump the camera, and use a tripod/gorillapod so the camera doesn't move at all.

  4. #14
    Marscaleb Guest
    I thought about using the self timer, but I didn't realize that they all came out so poorly until I got back home. Setting the camera on something was not an option for any of the angles I was trying. Getting a tripod requires money, which if I had I may just as well buy my own camera, a nicer camera.

    Actually I was taking pictures at dusk. But you know its part of the experience, as the time changed around me what was available to take pictures changed. I had wider views of streets when I started and sweet shots of lights and cars when I came to an end.

    Would low lighting really come out as blurry? I would assume it would come out as dark, to the point where it is not visible. I can understand that something indefinable might be blurry, but I had some decent light on most of these buildings. Everything I took came out blurry like the focus was bad, and on all the ones where there were bright spots from light (taken later in the evening) you could easily trace a clear motion blur.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    4,521
    There are a couple of potential issues.

    First, cameras have a hard time with autofocus when there isn't much light around. So it's possible that your shots are genuinely out of focus. It could also be the camera focusing on something else in the scene than what you were expecting. Secondly, cameras try and correctly expose an image, regardless of how much light is around. Therefore, when it is darker the camera keeps the shutter open longer, and you get blurry photos because of camera movement.

    Post a couple of example pictures and we'll see if we can track down the problem. For what it's worth, here's an out of focus shot I took the other day:


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Salisbury, UK
    Posts
    2,812
    MrC... I rather like that blurred shot

    I found
    my current avatar on google, so props to THIS GUY who created the original...

  7. #17
    Marscaleb Guest
    Nope, I've already deleted all of them. But in truth I don't believe I have EVER taken a really clear shot with that camera. Maybe some of the broad daylight pictures might not have been as atrocious as the ones I took the other night, but I think it is just a bad camera. Either way I'm not going to bother with it anymore. I've proven that I can take better shots with my cell phone, even if they are not as high of a resolution.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    4,521
    Well take photos with your cell phone and convert them to black and white. The rules state you can use anything that can capture an image.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    173
    Speaking of nightshooting, here's a short but sweet article on ISO vs. grain in digital cameras. It's mostly common knowledge for most photographers, but maybe someone well get something out of it.
    http://www.tested.com/news/blur-vs-g...-shooting/682/

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    4,166
    Oh man!!! I had no idea you were still running these Clone! I've been out of the loop.

    Marscaleb, a few things...

    First, you have to understand that even though it seems like you are getting plenty of light when night shooting in the city, you almost definitely are not getting enough to take hand held shots. There are some cameras with extremely high ISO capabilities, or lenses with extremely wide apertures that can handle these low light situations, but most can't, and I think it's safe to assume that your camera cannot either. The fact that you have clear motion blur on all the shots with a bright light proves exactly that. As MrC stated earlier...the shutter is opening for a long enough time to let enough light in to properly expose the image. You should not take hand held shots if the shutter is less than 1/60th of a second. You might get away with 1/30th if you have a really steady hand. The point is, I wouldn't make too quick of a decision about the camera without doing some daylight testing. You can also try taking it out at night again, resting it on something, and taking a few shots. Upload them to your PC and see if they're clear. If they are, then you know it isn't an issue with your camera focusing.

    Second, about the tripod thing...you don't have to spend a lot to get a tripod. Check out DealExtreme.com. They ship cheap crap at cheap prices with free shipping on everything. Yes, half the stuff s awful quality, but it generally works well enough to get the job done!

    Mini Tripod ($1.50): http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1309
    Standard Tripod ($14.25): http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.4758
    Monopod ($11.10): http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.42504

    All free shipping. At least get the mini tripod...if you can't afford that, then you should be selling your camera for food!
    -Mr. 3d


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