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  1. #1
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    How would you model this?

    One of the objects that I am modeling has a switch that looks like this:


    Just curious how people would model this object. I started with a cylinder, extruded half it sideways to get a lozenge shape. I divided this in half to give the two different thicknesses. I then took another cylinder, deleted half it and placed it on top for the piece that sticks out. I then grabbed the edges of this new cylinder, extruded it downward and added some divisions so that I could bend it and join it back up to the original shape. Using the Append to Polygon tool I then filled in all the gaps and finally I beveled the edges.

    How would you model this object?
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  2. #2
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    Im not great at modelling but iwould say spline modeling, then extrude n chamfer.

  3. #3
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    I hate splines.... so your way is probably the way I would have tackled it
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  4. #4
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    Looks alright the way you have it. I'd be tempted to delete out some edges and contiune some loops round just to keep things in quads tho'
    There is an exception to every rule, apart from this one.

  5. #5
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    A cube, a couple of extrudes, a couple of splits (for bevel boundaries) then bevels.

    The trick is using the boundary cuts to force the bevels to stay where you want them, then jacking up the divisions.

    http://img193.imageshack.us/img193/4731/switchx.jpg

    Cleanup, if necessary, would be the time consumer. The modeling bit took about 2 mins...
    Mostly Human since '74

  6. #6
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    Keezer, that's awesome! How did you get the top part to look so smooth with just a bevel? Did you use two bevels there?
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmakrzem View Post
    How did you get the top part to look so smooth with just a bevel? Did you use two bevels there?
    In Maya (I did mine in XSI, but the technique is the same) you can change the number of divisions in a bevel, which basically increases it's roundness. For that particular one, I beveled the top two edges, and set the divisions to 4 - you can see I didn't push the size of bevel quite far enough, from the double line in the middle.

    I originally picked this technique up from olblue at 3d-palace - he bevels (sorry, it's chamfering in Max ) like a crazy person. He would chamfer an edge, then take those new edges and chamfer them again - repeated until the corner was round enough for him. In Maya and XSI, the bevel tools do that already.
    Mostly Human since '74

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