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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    763
    Well thanks for the C-tip.. but I've already coded quite a bit of ANSI C before. However one of the things i stuggle with is trying NOT to immitate C++. I always tend to write structures and then functions starting with a structure name to act like a member function, and then with access to the structure variables by just passing it as an argument. Like:

    Code:
    typdef struct {
    	char *name;
    } user_t;
    
    void User_SetName(user_t *user, char* name) {
    	user->name = name;
    }
    Anyway, that was a bit off topic. Heh.

    Thanks for the info - I'm now a bit more sure that Computer Science is going to be my future.
    I didn't mean to do it.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    2,076
    Quote Originally Posted by redshock
    A degree focused on game or computer programming locks you in to one field the rest of your life, but a computer science degree with training outside of school in graphics, etc. will help your future be quite broad in possibilities.
    I'm a little confused. You say a computer programming degree which is basically what my Software Engineering degree is locks you into that field? I think if you want to become a programmer you pretty much have your mind straight that you want to pursue that career so I don't quite see how your locking yourself down into anything. Also having a broad knowledge can hurt you. You will become what they call a "Jack of all trades, master of known". I say this because I had a choice of going to ASU for a Computer Science degree or going to the University of Advancing Technology for Software Engineering with a minor in Game Programming and I chose the latter. I think that a Computer Science degree might be right for some people but definitely not everybody. This is my opinion after doing research and talking to people in the industry before I pursued my degree.

    P.S. A degree gets you in the door but after that it's your experience that pushes your career forward.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    107

    Thumbs up

    wow just reading this thread was very informative.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    21
    It really depends on the school. From what I have seen though, it is best to get a Computer Science degree first to ensure high pay salaries and still get an extra degree elsewhere that has a more specific target. I believe Digipen has a masters in computer science, so that would probably be a good path to take. Out of all the "get paid to make games" colleges, I think Digipen is the best that will land you a job, but a college that focuses on algorithms instead of games at first is just better in my own opinion. Opinions do vary, but this is simply my own.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Phoenix, Arizona
    Posts
    2,076
    Quote Originally Posted by redshock
    It really depends on the school. From what I have seen though, it is best to get a Computer Science degree first to ensure high pay salaries and still get an extra degree elsewhere that has a more specific target. I believe Digipen has a masters in computer science, so that would probably be a good path to take. Out of all the "get paid to make games" colleges, I think Digipen is the best that will land you a job, but a college that focuses on algorithms instead of games at first is just better in my own opinion. Opinions do vary, but this is simply my own.
    So basically your more of just talking about a major focusing strictly on game programming is not really the way to go but instead a major that allows you to learn the aspects of all programming is better. A degree is Software Engineering is broad in the sense you don't focus on one specific type of programming but it does still focus mainly on the process of creating software where as a Computer Science degree focuses more on the aspects of how a computer works and what it takes to make them work.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    21
    Yeah, that's pretty much what I'm trying to say. CS does discuss computer design, but that isn't it. It's algorithm development primarily which helps you in software engineering, deep mathematics and probability theory, computer design, etc. Most universities do not have just one type of computer science degree. There are several specialized areas. There are CS degrees at various universities that are focused on software engineering, hardware, graphics, AI, and so on. For example, your degree would say Computer Science: Graphics, or Computer Science: Software Engineering, etc. This depends on what the university has to offer of course.

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