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Thread: The Books

  1. #1
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    The Books

    I've seen a lot of "what books" questions comming up in the C++ forum, so I thought I would give a list of "The Books" that are most recommended in many C++ communities. These books cover a range of topics, but I doubt you would find very many C++ coders that didn't have these books in there collection. However for a more complete list I would suggest you visit the ACCU

    Note: Take the book ratings (beginner, intermediate, or advanced) with a grain of salt. It all depends on your skill set and thinking.

    Note: If you think a book is missing or want to add a usefull comment to one of the books listed just post it and I will add it.

    *** If you reply with a book recommendation please include the book title, the author, your thoughts on the book, and the book's level. ***


    General C++
    ------------
    Accelerated C++ (Most recommended beginner book) by Koenig [Beginner]

    Modern C++ Design (great book for generic programming and design patterns. Part of the Stroustrup series) by Alexandrescu [Intermediate]

    Effictive (and more effective) C++ by Scott Meyers (these are proably the most refered to books on C++ ever. Just about any mailing list of forum you will see a ton of "Look at items XX in Meyers book, it explains the issue" [Intermediate to Advanced]

    The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis [Intermediate]

    C++ Templates by Josuttis [Advanced]

    The C++ Programming Language (Get the "Special Edition" because it come with a cool bookmark ribbon) [Star Trek Advanced]

    Sams Data Structures and Algorithms (out of print so you will have to look, buts its an excellent book) [Intermediate]

    Code Complete by Steve McConnell is good, it talks about software developement in general, time management, project design and development, as well as many of the industry trends, and gotchas you might run into. Good for people wanting help on big projects. [Beginner to Intermediate](Bonehed316)

    Head First Design Patterns is a good intro book to design patterns (the important ones). Its java based, but is presented in a way where its applicable to any OOP language. Very good for people who dont want a reference book. [Intermediate to Advanced](Bonehed316)

    Design Patterns by Erich Gamma is a good book with most of the patterns you would expect, and is mostly a reference. It comes with 2 built in bookmarks (cloth ties) and is hardcover. Its really great, written for C++. [Intermidate to Advanced](Bonehed316)


    Windows API
    ------------
    Programming Windows by Charles Petzold (This is "THE" book on Win32 API) [Beginner to Intermediate]

    Programming Windows with MFC by Jeff Prosise (the MFC version of Petzolds book, but since M$ sucks.. MFC is dead) [Beginner to Intermediate]

    Game Programming and Design
    ------------
    Data Structures for Game Programmers by Penton (The only book worth a damn in Andre LaMothe's sorry Game Dev series) [Intermediate]

    Programming Linux Games from No Startch Press (I believe you can download this one for free now, with the exception of the OpenAL code not working (because OpenAL is a mysterious force that changes from day to day and is impossible to program (I would like to see VTM's on this!)) [Beginner]

    3D Game Engine Design by David Eberly, and its pretty decent. It doesnt go into "design" as much as a true engineer would in terms of key concepts, design choices and tradeoffs, but he does go into maths and concept pretty well, though concrete examples are a bit lacking now and then. The chapters on scene graphs are a bit glossy. [Intermediate to Advanced] (Bonehed316)

    Programming Vertex and Pixel shaders by Woflgang Engel is pretty good though, if you're into that sort of thing. some great stuff at the end [Beginner to Intermediate] (Bonehed316)

    Game Coding Complete is a pretty good book, it is a lot more in depth into the business side of games than any other book I've read. The books webpage is very good too, the author regularly answers questions you have, he is very helpful. Intermidate to Advanced (Notsosuperhero)

    3D Game Engine Programming, though I haven't read through the whole thing yet, is shaping up to be good, they take you through shaders and all that jazz, really good if you're looking to write a 3D engine. [Intermediate to Advanced] (Notsosuperhero)


    Simple Direct Media Layer (SDL)
    ------------
    Focus on SDL (good api reference book for SDL) [Beginner]

    DirectX
    ------------
    DirectX 9 Graphics by Alan Thorn is a good intro level to directx, how to isntantiate your device and do a few basic things with direct3d. Good examples, a little math in the front (so you know what is going on with matrices), and then some useful classes. Assumes you are fairly comfortable with win32 (instantiating a window and such). Goes over the basics of rendering in d3d pretty well. Great for n00bs Beginner (Bonehed316)

    OpenGL
    ------------
    None yet.

    wxWidgets
    ----------
    Cross-Platform GUI Programming with wxWidgets (the only book to chose from.. but its not too bad) [Beginner]

    Qt
    --
    C++ GUI Programming with Qt 3 (I'm sure a 2nd edition has been or will be released to cover Qt 4) [Beginner]
    Last edited by RShadow; 12-27-2005 at 02:56 AM. Reason: Added Books

  2. #2
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    Thanks much!

  3. #3
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    No Problem

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RShadow
    No Problem
    Actually i thank i owe you more then a "thanks much". This is actually really cool of you because there are so many C++ books and i had no idea which ones to buy, so thanks mate, now i now what to spend some of that christmas cash on.

  5. #5
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    Just remember that some of these books are for beginners and some are really advanced books. For example don't go buy The C++ Programming Language from Stroustrup and try to understand anything he is saying before knowing at least a little something about C++ (and your prepared to re-read the book about two billion time).

    So in short, if you buy any of these make sure you go over to the ACCU or amazon and check what level of content they contain.

  6. #6
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    whats wrong with the game dev series? lol
    -+- Prejudice Never Shows Much Reason -+-

  7. #7
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    This thread is a great idea, RShadow. This information can be merged into the FAQ thread later or kept in a separate stickied thread.

    Maybe the books can also be rated as beginner, intermediate or advanced?
    Forget the username, call me Keith

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylanjones
    whats wrong with the game dev series? lol
    lol, have you read them?

  9. #9
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    lol well i got half way through one and made a craps game, but when he was making monster I got confused lol
    -+- Prejudice Never Shows Much Reason -+-

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithathaide
    This thread is a great idea, RShadow. This information can be merged into the FAQ thread later or kept in a separate stickied thread.

    Maybe the books can also be rated as beginner, intermediate or advanced?
    Sound like a great idea. I added the ratings and made it a little easier to read.

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