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Thread: Frustrated

  1. #1
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    Frustrated

    I know it's no one's problem but mine, but can someone help me out?

    I have directx 9.0c sdk and dev-c++

    is this sufficient materials to learn c++ and DX?

    anything related would also be appreciated greatly.

    I'm using the tapes in downloads to learn 3ds max as well.

    I just want to learn tp understand the darn C++ code.

  2. #2
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    Well first do you know how to code in C++. If not then I would suggest you learn that before worrying about DX.

    Second, technically it is enough to learn, but unless you are a coding genious just those two resources alone won't help much. I would suggest you look up some tutorials. There are some links in the C++ tutorials Sticky at the top of the page.

    Mainly, make sure you know C++ really well.
    JapanGaku - Blog about Japan, J-Drama, and the Japanese Language
    BuddyLindsey.com - My Development Blog

  3. #3
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    If your already a good programmer in a language other than C++ (like for example C, Java, Pascal) then I would recommend the book "The C++ Programming Language" by Bjarne Stroustrup. If your new to programming then "Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days: Second Edition" is better for programming newbies.

    Also, the 3D Buzz videos are awesome although I've only seen the first C++ VTM that came with "Best of Buzz: volume 2", however the other VTMs look awesome as well. If you don't want to read a book then buy the VTMs they are great for beginners and intermediates will probably learn a thing or two as well.

    Don't worry about DX until your at least partly proficient in C++, in the mean time there's a good game making library for those who are learning called Allegro you can get it from www.allegro.cc it's easier than DX and will get you out of console programs quicker than if you wait until you're good enough for DX.

    DX is very low level and you need to write a lot of code just to get it started, for 3D stuff there is not even a scene graph and working with surfaces for 2D work is pretty low to the graphics card. Use Allegro or something similar, even the Windows GDI does the trick for newbies (but Allegro is easier).
    Mark - TheDrakeMan
    "The anatomical juxtaposition of two orbicularis oris muscles in a state of contraction."
    - Dr. Henry Gibbons, definition of a kiss
    "All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can't get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer." - IBM maintenance manual (1925)

  4. #4
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    Yeah GDI+ is awesome with the .NET framework. Some of the stuff i have seen it do in code samples blows me away.
    JapanGaku - Blog about Japan, J-Drama, and the Japanese Language
    BuddyLindsey.com - My Development Blog

  5. #5
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    First, a big Thank You to everyone.

    Next what is GDI+?

    Also, is there any other way to get my dirty little mitts on those videos? I would so pay for them, but I'm broke right now on SSI from a nast cut on my arm. That's why I have the time to learn. I'd do just about anything to have those videos, or to have the $35 to be able to go out of pocket at the moment I can wait if I have to, but it'd be nice for more info on that subject.

    C++ 21 days, definately getting it, my library HAS IT! lol

    Thanks again, and again.
    Last edited by NewbSabott; 04-28-2005 at 07:38 AM.

  6. #6
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    Also, is there any other way to get my dirty little mitts on those videos? I would so pay for them, but I'm broke right now on SSI from a nast cut on my arm. That's why I have the time to learn. I'd do just about anything to have those videos, or to have the $35 to be able to go out of pocket at the moment I can wait if I have to, but it'd be nice for more info on that subject.
    Your dirty little mitts can wait until you can pay for them, I'm not 100% on all rules at this site but I would have thought you shouldn't be asking people for copies. VTMs are supposed to be downloaded from 3dbuzz (or bought from their shop), read the disclaimer page when you click the download link.

    GDI is a library for Windows you can find good tutorials on the net. Also, you can find information on GDI from http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/ then follow the links on the left tree structure:
    Win32 and COM Development -> Graphics and Multimedia -> GDI+
    You can tonnes of stuff there but microsoft's reference material may be a little hard for some beginners to follow. I think you need to be using MSVS to use GDI+ but if you are using another compiler/IDE you may be able to download the Platform SDK.

    If you haven't done so already, take a look at Allegro as well it has good documentation and is a little easier than GDI.
    Mark - TheDrakeMan
    "The anatomical juxtaposition of two orbicularis oris muscles in a state of contraction."
    - Dr. Henry Gibbons, definition of a kiss
    "All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can't get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer." - IBM maintenance manual (1925)

  7. #7
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    GDI+ is the graphics inteface layer in the .NET framework if I remember correctly. And technically all you need to program things for that is notepad and the .NET framework.
    JapanGaku - Blog about Japan, J-Drama, and the Japanese Language
    BuddyLindsey.com - My Development Blog

  8. #8
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    GDI+ is the graphics inteface layer in the .NET framework if I remember correctly. And technically all you need to program things for that is notepad and the .NET framework.
    I've just been reading the GDI+ API and I don't believe that there is any requirement for using the .NET framework unless you want to use it in a managed language like C# or Managed C++. Based on my reading GDI+ is only a OO version, using C++ classes, of GDI with some additional features such as alpha blending. There is no need to use managed code or .NET (unless you want to). It should be fully supported in Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, for other versions of windows however you need to get the GDI+ redistributable.

    It all depends, do you want to use C++ or managed code?
    Mark - TheDrakeMan
    "The anatomical juxtaposition of two orbicularis oris muscles in a state of contraction."
    - Dr. Henry Gibbons, definition of a kiss
    "All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can't get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer." - IBM maintenance manual (1925)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDrakeMan
    It all depends, do you want to use C++ or managed code?
    %20 is a .Net freak, he would probably be using C# anyway
    A bit offtopic... can you write unmanaged C++ with .Net?
    I mean... just to use its libraries and all.


    KM
    "Things are like they are because thats how they are suposed to be"

  10. #10
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    You can invoke .NET events from native C++ code:here

    There needs to be some sort of native interface when shifting between unmanaged code and .NET. See the problem is that unmanaged C++ has different variables to managed code, also managed code is has its memory managed by the CLR (Common Language Runtime). The CLR is an implementation of the CLI (Common Language Infrastructure) specifcation.

    Managed code is similar in concept to Java however Microsoft did something really clever with the concept. That Java didn't, ANY language can be ported to .NET so long as it compiles to valid CIL (Common Intermediate Language). Microsoft did another thing that Sun didn't, that is, they provide the ability to not only compile .NET programs to CIL that runs in the CLR but they have allowed it to be compiled to native code.

    HOWEVER by native code I mean machine code not unmanaged C++. At the moment though .NET doesn't have a any good implementations that I'm aware of on non-Windows platforms. So provided you don't use OS specific libraries unmanaged C++ is more portable than .NET but .NET has that cool feature of language independence, of course an OS has language independence as well

    But you're right this is off-topic but this is a C++ forum not a .NET one so there is no real appropriate place for it
    Mark - TheDrakeMan
    "The anatomical juxtaposition of two orbicularis oris muscles in a state of contraction."
    - Dr. Henry Gibbons, definition of a kiss
    "All parts should go together without forcing. You must remember that the parts you are reassembling were disassembled by you. Therefore, if you can't get them together again, there must be a reason. By all means, do not use a hammer." - IBM maintenance manual (1925)

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